Seattle City Councilmember Bruce Harrell

Archive for March, 2013

Mar 20 2013

Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology Committee (3/20/13)

Public Safety, Civil Rights, And Technology Committee Agenda for Wednesday, 3/20/2013, 2:00 PM
Click here to view the complete agenda:

1. C.F. 312767
Appointment of Aaron Williams as member, Community Police Commission, for a term of confirmation to December 31, 201 6.
BRIEFING, DISCUSSION, AND POSSIBLE VOTE (5 minutes)

2. C.F. 312769
Appointment of Kip Yoshio Tokuda as member, Community Police Commission, for a term of confirmation to December 31, 2016.
BRIEFING, DISCUSSION, AND POSSIBLE VOTE (5 minutes)

3 C.F. 312807
Appointment of Bonnie J. Glenn as member, Firearms Review Board, for a term of confirmation to January 31, 2016.
BRIEFING, DISCUSSION, AND POSSIBLE VOTE (5 minutes)

4. C.F. 312806
Appointment of Patricia A. Eakes as member, Firearms Review Board, for a term of confirmation to January 31, 2016.
BRIEFING, DISCUSSION, AND POSSIBLE VOTE (5 minutes)

5. C.B. 117727
Related to the creation of the Office of the Community Police Commission within the Executive Department; amending Ordinance 124058 by establishing a budget control level, position authority and appropriations for the 2013 fiscal year; amending Section 1 of Ordinance 124021; creating new sections in Chapter 3.14 of the Seattle Municipal Code; and amending Section 4.13.010 of the Seattle Municipal Code to exempt a position from the Civil Service system; all by a 2/3 vote of the Cit y Council.
BRIEFING, DISCUSSION, AND POSSIBLE VOTE (15 minutes)

Supporting document:
a. Council Central Staff Memo

6. C.B. 117734

Related to the 2013 Budget; amending Ordinance 124058 by increasing appropriations to the Police Department and redu cing appropriations to Finance General, creating seven new positions, amending Council Green Sheet 67-1-A-1, and ratifying and confirming certain prior acts.
BRIEFING, DISCUSSION, AND POSSIBLE VOTE (15 minutes)

Supporting Document:
a. SPD for Department of Justice (DOJ) Agreement Implementation

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Mar 18 2013

Seattle City Council passes legislation to protect public’s privacy from surveillance equipment

Press Release issued on Monday, 3/18/13:

SEATTLE – The Seattle City Council today unanimously passed legislation to require City departments to obtain Council approval prior to acquiring certain surveillance equipment. Council Bill 117730 additionally requires Council review and approval of department protocols for operating the surveillance equipment and managing the data collected by it.

Through an open and transparent discussion, the Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology committee listened to the public’s concerns regarding the use of surveillance equipment and acted to ensure strong legislative protocols are in place to protect the public’s privacy and civil liberties.

Council Bill 117730 creates a decision framework for City departments to acquire surveillance equipment. Before acquiring any surveillance equipment, City departments must obtain approval from the City Council. The department must also propose operational protocols that address how the equipment will be used and protocols that address logistics around data retention, storage, and access. If the Council approves a department’s request to obtain the surveillance equipment, the department cannot use the equipment until Council adopts operational protocols by ordinance.

“With this inclusive legislation, the Council is proactively setting up a framework to ensure the public is involved regarding the use of surveillance equipment,” said Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology committee. “The City establishes public trust by earning it through openness and transparency in its decision making.”

“For me, the question is should a free society allow personal activities that occur in public to come under 24/7 surveillance? I think that this legislation strikes a balance that provides for safety without compromising the principles of our democracy,” said Councilmember Nick Licata.

“With this inclusive legislation, the Council is proactively setting up a framework to ensure the public is involved regarding the use of surveillance equipment,” said Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology committee. “The City establishes public trust by earning it through openness and transparency in its decision making.”

Departments that currently have surveillance equipment in place must propose operational and data management protocols for Council review and approval no later than 30 days after the effective date of Council Bill 117730.

The information required for the operational and data management protocols include:
1) A clear statement describing the purpose and use of the proposed surveillance equipment.
2) The type of surveillance equipment to be acquired and used.
3) The intended specific location of such surveillance equipment if affixed to a building or other structure.
4) How and when a department proposes to use the surveillance equipment, such as whether the equipment will be operated continuously or used only under specific circumstances.
5) How the department’s use of the equipment will be regulated to protect privacy and limit the risk of potential abuse.
6) A description of how and when data will be collected and retained and who will have access to any data captured by the surveillance equipment.
7) The extent to which activity will be monitored in real time as data is being captured and the extent to which monitoring of historically recorded information will occur.
8) A description of the nature and extent of public outreach conducted in each community in which the department intends to use the surveillance equipment.
9) The time period for which any data collected by surveillance equipment will be retained.
10) The methods for storing recorded information, including how the data is to be labeled or indexed. Such methods must allow for the department personnel and the City Auditor’s Office to readily search and locate specific data that is collected and determine with certainty that data was properly deleted, consistent with applicable law.
11) How the data may be accessed, including who will be responsible for authorizing access, who will be allowed to request access, and acceptable reasons for requesting access.
12) A viewer’s log or other comparable method to track viewings of any data captured or collected by the surveillance equipment, including the date, time, the individuals involved, and the reason(s) for viewing the records.
13) A description of the individuals who have authority to obtain copies of the records and how the existence and location of copies will be tracked.

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Mar 14 2013

Seattle City Councilmember Harrell seeks Commissioner applications for the Seattle Immigrant and Refugee Commission

Press Release issued on Wednesday, 3/13/13:

Seattle City Councilmember Bruce Harrell today announced commissioner openings for the Seattle Immigrant and Refugee Commission (IRC).

Reflecting the diversity of Seattle’s immigrant and refugee communities, the board will have 15 members (eight appointed by the Mayor and seven appointed by the City Council). Board members will be appointed to one or two-year terms, with the option of reappointment for another term.

With the unprecedented growth in the foreign-born population since the 1980s, Seattle has become an increasingly multi-cultural city, rich with diversity. In keeping with the Race and Social Justice Initiative, Mayor Mike McGinn and the Seattle City Council want to ensure that city government provides high-quality customer service to all, including immigrants and refugees living and working in Seattle. To this end, Seattle’s Immigrant and Refugee Commission was created in 2008 and re-established in 2012.

The duties of the Seattle Immigrant and Refugee Commission include:

• Advising the Mayor, City Council, and City departments and offices on ways to enhance and improve access to city services and resources for immigrants and refugees, as well as strengthening opportunities for immigrants and refugees to participate in civic life.
• Advising the City on successful implementation of the Immigrant and Refugee Action Plan and on future updates to the plan.
• Advising all city departments and offices in matters affecting immigrants and refugees, as appropriate.
• Encouraging understanding between and among the various immigrant and refugee communities and the larger Seattle community.
• Advocating on behalf of immigrant and refugees in the larger Seattle community.
• Assisting in the direction of the recently created Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs.

Applications for Council vacancies will be accepted through March 25, 2013. To apply, send a resume and a cover letter or short bio to linda.diibon@seattle.gov.

The formation of the Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs (OIRA) and its IRC Commission recognizes that Seattle is home to many immigrant and refugee communities and that language and cultural barriers can compromise equal access to government services and programs. These barriers combined with the complex nature of issues that affect immigrant and refugee communities, resulted in the creation of the OIRA and the IRC Commission. The Seattle Immigrant and Refugee Commission will help strengthen the relationship between government and immigrant and refugee communities.

To read more about the Seattle Immigrant and Refugee Commission and the City Ordinance that re-established the Commission, please click here and click here.

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Mar 12 2013

Seattle City Councilmember Bruce Harrell’s statement on ruling by U.S. District Judge Robart

Statement issued on Tuesday, 3/12/13:

SEATTLE – The Monitoring Plan for the first year was submitted by the federal monitor, Merrick Bobb, on March 5 and the Department of Justice filed its “Notice of Approval of the Monitoring Plan for the First Year” with the U.S. District Court on March 6. This afternoon, U.S. District Judge James Robart approved the Monitoring Plan.

Today, Councilmember Bruce Harrell, Chair of the Council’s Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee, released the following statement regarding the ruling by U.S. District Judge James Robart on the Monitoring Plan:

“This marks another significant step in moving forward together to implement the necessary long-lasting positive changes in the Police Department. As we have witnessed in the last few weeks, the Settlement Agreement process is complex. In speaking with the dedicated and hard-working police officers at the Seattle Police Department, I have no doubt we are moving in a positive direction to improve public trust and providing the highest level of service in a constitutional manner. The Monitoring Plan is a roadmap that sets clear metrics on achieving this outcome. As we move forward, we will hit speed bumps and at those times, we must all remind ourselves to put the City first in order to improve public trust and avoid any delays in implementation of the plan. The key will be openness, transparency, and collaboration.”

On Wednesday, March 13, at 5:30 pm, the Public Safety Committee will take action on the appointments to the Community Police Commission. The Community Police Commission will be presented to the public and the meeting will start with a public hearing. The Community Police Commission is a critical element of the Settlement Agreement to impartially review and make recommendations on policies related to use of force and biased policing.

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Mar 08 2013

Seattle’s Community Police Commission appointees are presented to the public

Media Advisory issued on Friday, 3/08/13:

Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Council’s Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee, will convene a special committee meeting on March 13 at 5:30 p.m. to consider legislation to move forward on the implementation of the Settlement Agreement with the Department of Justice (DOJ).

The committee will begin the meeting with a public hearing on the 15 Mayoral appointments to the Community Police Commission. All 15 members were appointed by the Mayor and are subject to confirmation by the City Council. Last October, the Council formally established the DOJ agreement’s Community Police Commission by ordinance through Council Bill 117608. Through this Council Bill, the Council established a clear selection criterion to ensure the members are representative of Seattle’s diverse population and are in a position to impartially review and make recommendations on policies related to use of force and biased policing.

The appointments are:
1) Claudia D’Allegri, Sea Mar Community Health Centers, Vice President of Behavioral Health;
2) Lisa Daugaard, Co-chair, Defender Association, Deputy Director;
3) Kate Joncas, Downtown Seattle Association, President and CEO;
4) Bill Hobson, Downtown Emergency Services Center, Executive Director;
5) Jay Hollingsworth, John T. Williams Organizing Committee;
6) Joseph Kessler, Seattle Police Department, Captain;
7) Diane Narasaki, Co-chair, Asian Counseling & Referral Service, Executive Director;
8) John Page, Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, Program Coordinator at the Defender Association’s Racial Disparity Project;
9) Tina Podlodowski, former Seattle City Councilmember;
10) Marcel Purnell, Youth Undoing Institutional Racism;
11) Jennifer Shaw, ACLU of Washington, deputy director,
12) Kevin Stuckey, Seattle Police Department, Officer;
13) Kip Tokuda, former State Representative for the 37th Legislative District;
14) Rev. Harriet Walden, Co-founder of Mothers for Police Accountability; and
15) Rev. Aaron Williams, Mount Zion Baptist Church, Senior Pastor.

The committee will also consider two pieces of legislation to provide resources and staffing to execute the Settlement Agreement. Council Bill 117727 will create a new Office of the Community Police Commission within the Executive Department at a cost of $362,865. The second Council Bill will provide funding to staff seven new positions at the Seattle Police Department to implement the Settlement Agreement at a set budget of $2,767,110. The two budget expenditures were accounted for when Council adopted the 2013 budget.

The Council will move forward expeditiously to implement the necessary long-lasting positive changes in the Police Department.

WHAT: Special Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee

WHEN: Wednesday, March 13, 2013, at 5:30 p.m.

WHERE: Council Chambers, second floor
Seattle City Hall, 600 Fourth Avenue, Seattle 98104

WHO: Councilmember Bruce A. Harrell
Councilmember Nick Licata
Councilmember Mike O’Brien
Council President Sally J. Clark
Councilmember Sally Bagshaw
Councilmember Tim Burgess
Councilmember Richard Conlin
Councilmember Jean Godden
Councilmember Tom Rasmussen

The committee will vote on the Mayor’s appointments to the Community Police Commission at this meeting.

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Mar 07 2013

Seattle City Council to hear from Department of Justice Monitor Merrick Bobb

Media Advisory issued on Thursday, 3/07/13:

Seattle City Council will host Merrick Bobb and members of the Monitoring team at Council Briefing on Monday, March 11. Bobb is the court-appointed independent monitor for the Department of Justice (DOJ) Settlement Agreement and will provide an update and briefing on the Monitoring Plan.

“The Council looks forward to hear Merrick Bobb’s thoughts and plans to help our Police Department implement the changes required under the Settlement Agreement. We are encouraged that a Monitoring Plan will soon be approved by the Court and look forward to a focused approach on specific outcomes,” said Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Public Safety committee.

The Monitoring Plan for the first year was submitted on March 5 and the Department of Justice filed its “Notice of Approval of the Monitoring Plan for the First Year” with the U.S. District Court on March 6. This is a critical checkpoint in Seattle’s DOJ Settlement Agreement. The proposed Monitoring Plan establishes expectations and guidance for the City and DOJ on how the Monitor will assess compliance with the Settlement Agreement.

Monitoring Plan as submitted to U.S. Federal District Judge Hon. James Robart on March 5.

WHAT: Council Briefing

WHEN: Monday, March 11, 2013, at 9 a.m.

WHERE: Council Chambers, second floor
Seattle City Hall, 600 Fourth Avenue, Seattle 98104

WHO: Council President Sally J. Clark
Councilmember Bruce A. Harrell
Councilmember Sally Bagshaw
Councilmember Tim Burgess
Councilmember Richard Conlin
Councilmember Jean Godden
Councilmember Nick Licata
Councilmember Mike O’Brien
Councilmember Tom Rasmussen
Merrick Bobb (Department of Justice Monitoring Team)
Chris Moulton (Department of Justice Monitoring Team)
Nick Armstrong (Department of Justice Monitoring Team)
Peter Ehrlichman (Department of Justice Monitoring Team)
Ronald Ward (Department of Justice Monitoring Team)

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