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Seattle City Councilmember Bruce Harrell

Archive for June, 2014

Jun 30 2014

Positive Focus June E-Newsletter

Read the June Positive Focus E-Newsletter at: http://www.mailermailer.com/x?function=view&c=88659290h-0ca50bab%2a1073275v-864a624d

Topics are: City Council Confirms Kathleen O’Toole as Chief of Police, Public Safety: A Deeper Analytical Dive, Minimum Wage, Job Assistance Check-In, Honoring Reverend Dr. Samuel B. McKinney, and Body Camera Check-In.

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Jun 25 2014

Councilmember Harrell Statement on Mayor’s Public Safety Speech

SEATTLE – Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Council’s Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee, issued the following statement today regarding Mayor Ed Murray’s state of the city public safety speech:

“I applaud Mayor Murray for outlining a pragmatic, call-to-action public safety plan. I would like to express my gratitude to the Mayor for prioritizing public safety and calling all departments to engage in addressing public safety. I believe our focus, commitment and collaborative partnerships will be much different than what this city has ever seen. We will work together to implement the short-term solutions and set the budget for long-term solutions that address the underlying root causes of the problems we are seeing.

“In addition to supporting the Mayor’s ‘Summer of Safety’ plan, I hope to continue working with the Mayor on the following policy and public safety budget issues:

1) Explore the feasibility of an automated gunshot locator system (AGLS) in the fall biennial City budget. The system uses acoustic sensors to instantly triangulate and identify the exact location of gunfire. This technology, often coupled with an activated camera system when shots occur in hotspot corridors, deters activities and significantly increases intelligence gathering of unlawful shooting activity.
2) A complete assessment of crime prevention programs targeting and helping 18-30 year olds. This group is often referred to as “opportunity youth,” young people who are disconnected from education and employment pathways to success.
3) Seek a resolution to the unresolved ambiguity regarding the legality of medical dispensaries in Seattle. Medical dispensaries should provide access to medical quality cannabis to patients in need, not as a breeding ground for criminal activity as we’ve seen in recent violent incidents.
4) Partner with the community, local businesses, local sports teams, and faith-based communities to discourage the “No-Snitch” code. This “code” has been changed in other communities by changing the narrative to describing an opportunity to protect and serve one’s community.
5) Chief O’Toole must identify and support Precinct captains with a set of expectations for the foreseeable future and establish reasonable continuity in these positions. This is a particular concern to Southeast Seattle.
6) Examine community benefit agreements for employers to incentivize development in hotspot corridors. The city should partner with regional employers and labor to expand the summer youth program and increase training opportunities. As the Mayor stated, “nothing stops a bullet like a job.”

“In addition to these items, Council will work with the Mayor and Chief O’Toole to focus on these major areas to improve public safety:

1) Focused and proactive crime reduction using evidence-based methods to reduce the most serious neighborhood crime problems;
2) Positively change the culture at SPD and attitudes related to the practice of collecting and reporting the required data as part of the six new policies developed as part of the Settlement Agreement;
3) Build community relationships and trust in all neighborhoods with a consistent visible presence; and,
4) Prioritize build out of the Business Intelligence System.

“As part of the confirmation of Chief O’Toole this last Monday, Council presented a letter of expectations to Chief O’Toole. Read the complete six-page letter of expectations to Chief O’Toole here.

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Jun 23 2014

Council Confirms Kathleen O’Toole as Chief of Police

SEATTLE – City Council voted 8-1 to confirm Kathleen O’Toole as the next Chief of Police for the Seattle Police Department (SPD). O’Toole began work with the Boston Police Department in 1979 and has over three decades of experience as a police officer, Commissioner, Chief Inspector and attorney.


“Chief O’Toole has earned an international reputation for her ability to lead and inspire officers, change and reform a department and work with communities from the ground up to reduce crime in urban neighborhoods,” said Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology committee.

O’Toole’s top four priorities are: 1) restoring public trust, 2) restoring SPD pride and professionalism, 3) addressing crime and quality of life issues, and 4) promoting best business practices. O’Toole has committed during the first 90 days to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the police department, which would culminate in a plan of action with measurable goals and objectives.

The Council also presented written expectations for O’Toole. Progress reports will be submitted to Council quarterly, beginning at the end of the third quarter of 2014. Council would like to see progress in these major areas: focused and proactive crime reduction using evidence-based methods to reduce the most serious neighborhood crime problems; positively change the culture at SPD and attitudes related to the practice of collecting and reporting the required data for the six new policies developed as part of the Settlement Agreement; build community relationships in all neighborhoods with a consistent visible presence; and, prioritize build out of the Business Intelligence System.

Council’s confirmation vote concludes the City’s six month-long process to find a new Police Chief. Mayor Murray launched a national search in January with an extensive public outreach plan that included seven community workshops throughout Seattle and an online forum to receive feedback. To reach non-English speaking communities, online and print advertisements were placed in Somali, African-American, Chinese, Korean, Spanish and Vietnamese publications.

The Mayor appointed community members to two committees. The Community Advisory Committee consisted of a 32-member panel representing the diverse communities of Seattle and assisted in providing feedback from a community perspective. Secondly, a 12-member Search Committee was formed to screen all applicants and tasked to present the Mayor with three finalists.

Council President Tim Burgess stated, “Chief O’Toole has the skillset, experience and personality to move our police department forward through a new era of reform and improvement. The women and men of the department who work tirelessly on our behalf yearn for the clear leadership and direction Chief O’Toole will bring.”

“What an opportunity! I welcome Ms. O’Toole’s approach to building neighborhood-specific policing plans,” said Councilmember Sally Bagshaw. “She will be a great partner to those of us working to make downtown and our other neighborhoods safe and welcoming for everyone. I am delighted she has been selected to lead the Seattle Police Department and look forward to making Seattle a positive model for cooperative policing.”

“I’m looking forward to Chief O’Toole taking over,” said Councilmember Sally J. Clark. “She’s demonstrated great leadership and accomplishment in her career leading to this step. I’m impressed with her depth of knowledge and commitment to high caliber policing and safe neighborhoods in Seattle.”

“A rigorous search revealed the best candidate for Seattle’s next police chief as Kathleen O’Toole,” said Councilmember Jean Godden. “It is a proud day for Seattle to confirm such a qualified leader, and a woman, as police chief.”

“We have hired O’Toole for one major task: reform our police department. The Council’s task is to help her succeed,” said Councilmember Nick Licata. “If she does, we will have more responsive and effective policing in our city.”

The Mayor announced O’Toole as his appointee on May 19. The Public Safety committee conducted three confirmation meetings: June 4, June 11 and June 12. The June 11th meeting was held offsite in the community at New Holly Gathering Hall. As part of the extensive outreach process, the committee sent approximately one thousand emails to community groups and ethnic minority groups asking for feedback and making them aware of the police chief confirmation process. Feedback was also solicited on Council’s Facebook and Twitter accounts.

The Chief of Police will manage an annual operating budget of approximately $290 million and will be responsible for leading and managing 2,000 employees at SPD.

For more information regarding Kathleen O’Toole, please visit the following links:

Council’s Police Chief Confirmation Website
Kathleen O’Toole’s Confirmation Packet
Council’s written letter of expectations to Chief O’Toole
Kathleen O’Toole’s written confirmation questions and answers
Kathleen O’Toole’s written exam

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Jun 12 2014

Council Public Safety Committee Confirms Kathleen O’Toole

SEATTLE – City Council’s Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee, chaired by Councilmember Bruce Harrell, voted 5-0 this afternoon to recommend confirmation of Kathleen O’Toole as the next Chief of Police for the Seattle Police Department (SPD).

The Committee recommendation will move to a Full Council vote on Monday, June 23 at 2:00 pm.

The Public Safety committee conducted three confirmation meetings: June 4, June 11 and June 12. The June 11th meeting was held offsite in the community at New Holly Gathering Hall. As part of the extensive outreach process, the committee sent approximately a thousand emails to community groups and ethnic minority groups asking for feedback and making them aware of the police chief confirmation process. Feedback and questions were also solicited on Facebook and Twitter.

“We have heard overwhelming support that Kathleen O’Toole should be our next Police Chief, and the process suggests that she has the attributes, proficiency and proven record to lead SPD,” said Councilmember Harrell. “The Committee moved with a sense of urgency while conducting a thorough and transparent confirmation process. I look forward to working with Ms. O’Toole and meeting the challenges head-on to rebuild community trust and confidence, and developing neighborhood public safety plans from the bottom-up.”

• Council’s Police Chief Confirmation Website
• Council’s written letter of expectations to Chief O’Toole
• Kathleen O’Toole’s written confirmation questions and answers

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Jun 12 2014

Council Public Safety Committee to Vote on Police Chief Nominee

SEATTLE – Councilmember Bruce Harrell will convene a special Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology committee meeting this afternoon to complete the committee confirmation process and vote on Kathleen O’Toole’s confirmation as Seattle Police Chief. O’Toole was nominated for Chief of Police by Mayor Ed Murray on May 19, and her appointment is subject to Council confirmation.

Councilmembers listened to public feedback on Wednesday night and reviewed written answers from Ms. O’Toole. Councilmember Harrell also introduced the draft letter of expectations for the new Police Chief.

The Committee recommendation will be subject to a Full Council vote, scheduled for June 23 at 2:00 pm.

WHAT:
Kathleen O’Toole Confirmation Meeting and Vote

WHEN:
3 p.m., Thursday, June 12

WHERE:
Seattle City Hall
Council Chambers, Second floor
600 Fourth Ave, Seattle 98104

WHO:
Seattle City Councilmembers
Mayor’s Office
Police Chief Nominee Kathleen O’Toole

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Jun 10 2014

Councilmember Harrell to Host Public Forum on Police Chief Nominee

SEATTLE – Councilmember Bruce Harrell will convene a public hearing in the community this Wednesday evening to hear feedback regarding Police Chief nominee, Kathleen O’Toole. O’Toole was nominated for Chief of Police by Mayor Ed Murray on May 19, and her appointment is subject to Council confirmation.

Each member of the public will have up to two minutes to address the committee, and public comment sign-up sheets will be available at 5:00 p.m. Councilmembers will continue their round of questions and review written answers from Ms. O’Toole over the second half of the committee meeting. The committee will also introduce the draft letter of expectations from Council. The Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology Committee will reconvene the following day, Thursday, June 12, to complete the confirmation process and vote on her confirmation. Full Council is expected to vote on the nomination on June 23.

Councilmember Harrell is also accepting feedback by phone and email at bruce.harrell@seattle.gov or (206)684-8804.

WHAT:
Public Hearing on Seattle Police Chief Nominee, Kathleen O’Toole

WHEN:
5:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 11

WHERE:
New Holly Gathering Hall
7054 32nd Ave. South, Seattle WA 98118

WHO:
Seattle City Councilmembers
Mayor’s Office
Public

Council’s Police Chief Confirmation Website

Upcoming critical dates for the Police Chief Confirmation:

Thursday, June 12, 3:00 p.m. in Council Chambers
Committee meeting and vote on confirmation

Monday, June 23, 2:00 p.m. in Council Chambers
Full Council Final Action on confirmation

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